Lost Malawi English Breakfast Tea

£6.99

Handcrafted black tea blended from harvests across one small, independent estate in the Shire Highlands. The oldest tea estate in Malawi and still family run.

Size: 50g tin

Tasting Notes
Deep, rich and malty, it has notes of caramel and burnt sugar. Delicious black, becoming sweet and chocolatey with the addition of milk.

Quantity
Use 2.5g of tea per 150ml of water.

Temperature
For the optimum infusion use 85°C (185°F) water. If you like milk, please use water at 100°C (212°F).

Time
Infuse for 1 - 2 minutes, tasting regularly.

Infusion
You can infuse this tea at least twice. With each careful infusion, different subtleties of flavour are revealed.

The Satemwa Tea Estate
Grown and lovingly made on a farm called Satemwa on Thyolo Mountain in the Shire Highlands of Malawi. Satemwa is the oldest tea estate in Malawi, still run by the same family - Alex is the 3rd generation Kay to look after the garden.

Depth - 3D tea

This is not a modern industrial blend churned out by vast machines. Lost Malawi is an old fashioned tea crafted in small batches with great care. It has a depth and quality almost forgotten. To compare this to an ordinary tea would be like comparing a line-drawing with a sculpture. This is like drinking normal tea but in 3D.

Single Estate Varietals
Like all good crops the leaf is seasonal - picked only when the tea bush is at is best. The tea is blended from different varietals and harvests across the estate to build great depth of flavour and rich complexity. Lost Malawi is the perfect breakfast or afternoon Tea. Delicious with milk and sugar, it is also wonderful on its own. It goes splendidly with eggs and bacon and clotted cream and scones.

Organic
Our teas are organically grown and our farmers are committed to sustainable farming practices. However; we work with small producers who don't always have the money or manpower for the complex and costly process of organic certification. We have our teas tested ourselves- taking on the expense and logistics rather than burdening the farmers.